Perceived risk and value of workplace safety in a developing country

Perceived risk and value of workplace safety in a developing country
Posted on February 1, 2010
Authors: Liu Jin-Tan, Hammitt James K
Journal of Risk Research 1999 2(3): 263-275  PubmedID: 4846537   ISSN/ISBN: 13669877   DOI: 10.1080/136698799376835
We examine the relationship between wages and perceived occupational health risks for petrochemical workers in Taiwan. We estimate hedonic wage functions to compare workers' wages to their perceived risks of fatal and disabling accidents. The results indicate that workers in risky jobs receive a compensating wage differential, after controlling for education, job tenure, and occupational classification. The values of mitigating health risks are estimated using models that control for both fatal and nonfatal accident risks, and so do not suffer the omitted-variable bias characteristic of most earlier studies. The estimated values of statistical life and disabling injury are US$624 000 and US$44 000 in 1995 dollars. We also find a positive relationship between quitting intentions and perceived job risk, which supports the hypothesis that workers' risk perceptions evolve with on-the-job experience. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]; Copyright of Journal of Risk Research is the property of Routledge and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)