Jane J. Kim

Professor of Health Decision Science
Health Policy and Management
Harvard School of Public Health
Professor
(617) 432-0095
Home page:
PubMed Publications


Jane J. Kim, Ph.D. is a Professor of Health Decision Science in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Dr. Kim's research focuses on the development and application of mathematical modeling methods to evaluate health policy issues related to women's health. She has developed and used models to perform cost-effectiveness analyses of cervical cancer screening strategies in the U.S., Europe, Hong Kong, and less developed regions. Her methodological interests include capitalizing on different methods of operations research to inform health decision-making in low-resource settings, such as packaging health services at opportune moments and quantifying the impact of budget and human resource constraints on program effectiveness. She has won awards for her presentations at annual meetings held by the Society for Medical Decision Making and the International Papillomavirus Society. Dr. Kim holds a Master's degree in Health Policy and Management from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (2001) and a Ph.D. in Health Policy and Decision Sciences from Harvard University (2005). During her doctoral training, she was the recipient of training grants from the National Cancer Institute and the National Library of Medicine.

Instructor:
Jane Kim
Term:
Spring 1
An intermediate/advanced course on methods and health applications of decision analysis that extends the foundation provided in RDS2 280, with an emphasis on modeling techniques, assessment of uncertainty, ROC analysis and diagnostic technology assessment.

Application of Decision Science to Mental Health Policy

Not only are resources for mental health scarce, but they are also distributed inequitably

Comparative and Cost-Effectiveness of Preventing HPV-Related Diseases

Using decision-analytic approach to examine the health and economic consequences of alternative strategies in the prevention of HPV-related diseases

Comparative Effectiveness of the Cervical Cancer Screening Process: Past, Present and Future

Using decision analysis to improve effectiveness of cervical cancer screening process and outcomes

Disparities in Cancer Prevention and Control

Much of the disparity in cancer outcome is a reflection of type, timeliness, and continuity of cancer care rather than the disease itself

HPV Vaccine Policy Model

Decision models to guide the development and evaluation of HPV vaccines and diagnostics

Packaging Adolescent Health Services in Resource-Limited Settings

Identifying adolescent health services that can be integrated with HPV vaccination to maximize health benefits

Prevention of Cervical Cancer in the U.S.

Informing cervical cancer prevention policy and clinical guidelines in the U.S.